A visitor is seen at the new solar power plant of the South African arm of Heineken, at the company’s Sedibeng, Midvaal brewery in Johannesburg, South Africa, on October 26. Governments, businesses and international bodies need to come together to build resilience, but what’s stopping them? Photo: Reuters
A visitor is seen at the new solar power plant of the South African arm of Heineken, at the company’s Sedibeng, Midvaal brewery in Johannesburg, South Africa, on October 26. Governments, businesses and international bodies need to come together to build resilience, but what’s stopping them? Photo: Reuters
Andrew Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Sheng

Climate solutions will come from those on the front lines of the crisis, not wealthy leaders

  • As world leaders drag their heels over climate solutions and who should implement them, communities are seeking to address climate issues at a local level
  • Funding grass-roots action strengthens local resilience and adaptability, while helping to break the government-corporation deadlock

A visitor is seen at the new solar power plant of the South African arm of Heineken, at the company’s Sedibeng, Midvaal brewery in Johannesburg, South Africa, on October 26. Governments, businesses and international bodies need to come together to build resilience, but what’s stopping them? Photo: Reuters
A visitor is seen at the new solar power plant of the South African arm of Heineken, at the company’s Sedibeng, Midvaal brewery in Johannesburg, South Africa, on October 26. Governments, businesses and international bodies need to come together to build resilience, but what’s stopping them? Photo: Reuters
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