Labourers remove scaffolding at the Al Bayt stadium in Al Khor, Qatar on April 29, 2019. Migrant labourers who built Qatar’s World Cup stadiums often worked long hours under harsh conditions and were subjected to discrimination, wage theft and other abuses, a rights group said. Photo: AP
Labourers remove scaffolding at the Al Bayt stadium in Al Khor, Qatar on April 29, 2019. Migrant labourers who built Qatar’s World Cup stadiums often worked long hours under harsh conditions and were subjected to discrimination, wage theft and other abuses, a rights group said. Photo: AP
Felix Papier
Opinion

Opinion

Felix Papier and Christopher Tang

Qatar World Cup scandal: how firms can banish forced labour ‘blind spots’ in their supply chain

  • The onus is on companies to exercise better due diligence, focusing on high-risk areas, avoiding shady recruiters, improving supply chain visibility and using tech to monitor and authenticate

Labourers remove scaffolding at the Al Bayt stadium in Al Khor, Qatar on April 29, 2019. Migrant labourers who built Qatar’s World Cup stadiums often worked long hours under harsh conditions and were subjected to discrimination, wage theft and other abuses, a rights group said. Photo: AP
Labourers remove scaffolding at the Al Bayt stadium in Al Khor, Qatar on April 29, 2019. Migrant labourers who built Qatar’s World Cup stadiums often worked long hours under harsh conditions and were subjected to discrimination, wage theft and other abuses, a rights group said. Photo: AP
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