Activists from India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) take part in a demonstration in Bhubaneshwar on December 17, 2022. BJP supporters set fire to an effigy of Pakistan Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari during a protest against remarks he made about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a press conference at the United Nations. Photo: AFP
Activists from India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) take part in a demonstration in Bhubaneshwar on December 17, 2022. BJP supporters set fire to an effigy of Pakistan Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari during a protest against remarks he made about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a press conference at the United Nations. Photo: AFP
Abdul Basit
Opinion

Opinion

Abdul Basit

From Taliban’s return to Hindutva’s spread, terrorism and extremism in South Asia have become more fragmented

  • While geopolitical developments and the Covid-19 pandemic pushed terrorism down South Asian countries’ priority list, its spread has continued
  • The Taliban’s return had a relatively limited impact, though the Pakistani Taliban kept up its insurgency and evidence emerged of Hindutva’s global presence

Activists from India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) take part in a demonstration in Bhubaneshwar on December 17, 2022. BJP supporters set fire to an effigy of Pakistan Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari during a protest against remarks he made about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a press conference at the United Nations. Photo: AFP
Activists from India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) take part in a demonstration in Bhubaneshwar on December 17, 2022. BJP supporters set fire to an effigy of Pakistan Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari during a protest against remarks he made about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during a press conference at the United Nations. Photo: AFP
READ FULL ARTICLE