A security guard on duty at  Hong Kong West Kowloon Railway Station. Some 46,000 to 87,000 workers, mostly security guards and cleaners, will benefit when the city’s new wage floor comes into effect in May. Photo: Sam Tsang
A security guard on duty at Hong Kong West Kowloon Railway Station. Some 46,000 to 87,000 workers, mostly security guards and cleaners, will benefit when the city’s new wage floor comes into effect in May. Photo: Sam Tsang
SCMP Editorial
Opinion

Opinion

Editorial by SCMP Editorial

Minimum wage rise fails to fully reward Hong Kong’s working poor

  • An increase of 7 per cent after a four-year freeze may sound generous, but it will not go far in expensive city

A security guard on duty at  Hong Kong West Kowloon Railway Station. Some 46,000 to 87,000 workers, mostly security guards and cleaners, will benefit when the city’s new wage floor comes into effect in May. Photo: Sam Tsang
A security guard on duty at Hong Kong West Kowloon Railway Station. Some 46,000 to 87,000 workers, mostly security guards and cleaners, will benefit when the city’s new wage floor comes into effect in May. Photo: Sam Tsang
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