Robots conduct welding work at the workshop of an automobile manufacturing factory in Qingdao, Shandong province, on January 14. China’s steady progression up the manufacturing value chain means developments such as Dell’s intention to reduce its dependence on China might not be that damaging. Photo: Xinhua
Robots conduct welding work at the workshop of an automobile manufacturing factory in Qingdao, Shandong province, on January 14. China’s steady progression up the manufacturing value chain means developments such as Dell’s intention to reduce its dependence on China might not be that damaging. Photo: Xinhua
Edward Tse
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Edward Tse

Why China’s move up value chain means Dell’s departure is no big deal

  • Rather than being alarmed and making conclusions about the entire economy, the Dell news needs to be put in context of China’s development
  • Labour-intensive industries are leaving the country to be replaced by higher value-added sectors, and China’s advantages are hard to replicate elsewhere

Robots conduct welding work at the workshop of an automobile manufacturing factory in Qingdao, Shandong province, on January 14. China’s steady progression up the manufacturing value chain means developments such as Dell’s intention to reduce its dependence on China might not be that damaging. Photo: Xinhua
Robots conduct welding work at the workshop of an automobile manufacturing factory in Qingdao, Shandong province, on January 14. China’s steady progression up the manufacturing value chain means developments such as Dell’s intention to reduce its dependence on China might not be that damaging. Photo: Xinhua
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