Used clothes at a recycling facility. Every time we load up a washing machine with clothes made from polyester or other synthetic fibres, we release anywhere between 640,000 and 1.5 million pieces of synthetic microfibre. Photo: Shutterstock
Used clothes at a recycling facility. Every time we load up a washing machine with clothes made from polyester or other synthetic fibres, we release anywhere between 640,000 and 1.5 million pieces of synthetic microfibre. Photo: Shutterstock
Philippe Li
Opinion

Opinion

Philippe Li

How Hong Kong’s nastiest plastic pollutant – microfibre – hides in plain sight

  • Synthetic microfibres, mainly shed from polyester clothes, are the most common microplastics in Hong Kong’s waste water
  • While studies elsewhere show microfibres being ingested indoors and from eating seafood, little is known about the effects here

Used clothes at a recycling facility. Every time we load up a washing machine with clothes made from polyester or other synthetic fibres, we release anywhere between 640,000 and 1.5 million pieces of synthetic microfibre. Photo: Shutterstock
Used clothes at a recycling facility. Every time we load up a washing machine with clothes made from polyester or other synthetic fibres, we release anywhere between 640,000 and 1.5 million pieces of synthetic microfibre. Photo: Shutterstock
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