A shopper in a supermarket in Warsaw, Poland, on December 9, 2022. Since the second quarter of 2021, much of the world has been experiencing inflation far above 2 per cent. Photo: AP
A shopper in a supermarket in Warsaw, Poland, on December 9, 2022. Since the second quarter of 2021, much of the world has been experiencing inflation far above 2 per cent. Photo: AP
Willem H. Buiter
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Willem H. Buiter

Sustained slower growth may be a reality for China and others, but high inflation can be tamed

  • War and the pandemic left most countries facing high inflation and low growth in 2022
  • While there is always the risk of further shocks, stagflation need not become a long-term problem, provided monetary authorities maintain restrictive policies

A shopper in a supermarket in Warsaw, Poland, on December 9, 2022. Since the second quarter of 2021, much of the world has been experiencing inflation far above 2 per cent. Photo: AP
A shopper in a supermarket in Warsaw, Poland, on December 9, 2022. Since the second quarter of 2021, much of the world has been experiencing inflation far above 2 per cent. Photo: AP
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