image

South Korea Business Report

Presented by

Discovery Reports

AngioLab harnesses expertise in angiogenesis to promote health and well-being

A pioneer in angiogenesis biotech, AngioLab develops angiogenesis inhibitors for various therapeutic interventions, and is open to collaborations for technology transfer

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 25 October, 2017, 10:36am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 25 October, 2017, 10:36am

When AngioLab’s founder and CEO Dr Kim Min-young established the company in 1999, there was no angiogenesis drug treatment available in the market. Abnormal angiogenesis, or the new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vasculature, plays a role in numerous pathologies including cancer, obesity, ocular disease, arthritis, psoriasis and other diseases.

Drawing from extensive experience in angiogenesis research and in-house core technologies, AngioLab develops angiogenesis inhibitors for various therapeutic interventions.

“Similar to tumour tissue, adipose tissue growth depends on angiogenesis. Our anti-angiogenic multifunctional drugs and nutraceuticals treat and prevent angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as obesity, ocular and skin diseases, with much less side effects,” Kim says.

A pioneer in angiogenesis biotech, Korea New Exchange-listed AngioLab has received numerous research grants. It has more than 60 domestic and international patents registered in the United States, Europe, Japan, China and other countries.

Now in phase III clinical trial is ALS-L1023, AngioLab’s anti-abdominal obesity-botanical drug.

Our anti-angiogenic multifunctional drugs and nutraceuticals treat and prevent angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as obesity, ocular and skin diseases, with much less side effects
Kim Min-young

“Other anti-obesity drugs suppress the appetite, which affects the central nervous system. ALS-L1023 focuses on the peripheral target, reducing visceral fat by inhibiting adipose tissue angiogenesis,” Kim says.

AngioLab’s anti-abdominal obesity dietary supplement, Ob-X, reduces abdominal and liver fat by inhibiting angiogenesis. Exported to the US, Europe, Japan, Taiwan, and Pakistan,

Ob-X has been approved by South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety as a specific health functional food with health claim.

Other anti-angiogenic candidates under development include McEye for treating ocular diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). McEye is the only wet AMD drug in phase II clinical trial that is orally available and more cost-effective.

Others are Periostatin, a botanical anti-periodontitis drug that inhibits gum tissue degradation, and Wrinklestat, an anti-wrinkle functional cosmetic product for preventing ultraviolet-induced wrinkle formation.

AngioLab is open to collaborations for technology transfer. The company seeks partnerships with pharmaceutical companies to support the clinical trials of its products overseas, and established distribution networks for the commercialisation of its drugs and nutraceuticals. It also seeks local Asian distributors for its nutraceuticals, particularly in China and Indonesia.

www.angiolab.co.kr