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American films

Film review – Maze Runner: The Death Cure offers bellowing conclusion to young adult trilogy

Dizzying action scenes, good pacing and a nice addition to the cast help the concluding part of young adult series along as Thomas and his fellow rebels look to storm The Last City while the killer Flare virus continues to rage

PUBLISHED : Monday, 22 January, 2018, 7:00am
UPDATED : Monday, 22 January, 2018, 7:00am

3/5 stars

The final part of the young adult trilogy directed by Wes Ball comes to a bellowing conclusion with The Death Cure. Plunging us straight onto a moving train, we rejoin Thomas (Dylan O’Brien), one of those who endured psychological experimentation like a lab rat to find a solution to the Flare, a killer virus that turns humans into rabid flesh-eaters.

With the Flare still wiping out millions, Thomas and his fellow rebels are looking to storm The Last City, a walled and guarded refuge where those yet to be infected have secreted themselves. Their mission is to find Minho (Ki Hong Lee), one of their number who is still being held and tested by W.C.K.D, the ruthless company charged with finding a cure.

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With Thomas accompanied by Newt (Thomas Brodie-Sangster), Brenda (Roza Salazar) and others, the action chugs along well, notably a dizzying scene when a bus full of escaped kids is picked up by a crane, swinging it around the city’s skyscrapers. There’s also a nice addition to the cast in the shape of Walton Goggins, who plays a deformed outlier who helps the gang penetrate The Last City.

Ball’s enthusiasm for James Dashner’s series of books shines through – perhaps slightly too much, with the final act taking a little too long to find closure. The adult actors, including Barry Pepper and Giancarlo Esposito, are also given precious little to chew on. But this was always a franchise for teenagers first and foremost; adolescent fans will lap it up.

Maze Runner: The Death Cure opens on January 25

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