As part of any trade war deal, the US has been keen to attain better access to China’s lucrative energy market for its companies. Photo: Cheniere Energy

China needs it, the US has it, but why might a trade war energy deal not be the easy win it appears to be?

  • The US will soon be a net exporter of energy, while China is the world’s biggest importer, suggesting energy would be low-hanging fruit in a trade war deal
  • However, issues over energy security and market access complicate the dynamic, with China keen to maintain control over its domestic market
Topic |   China economy

TOP PICKS

As part of any trade war deal, the US has been keen to attain better access to China’s lucrative energy market for its companies. Photo: Cheniere Energy
READ FULL ARTICLE
Eric Ng

Eric Ng

Eric joined the SCMP in 1998 after brief stints in a trading company and translation and editing roles at Dow Jones and Edinburgh Financial Publishing. He has close to 20 years of experience covering China's energy, mining and industrial materials sectors, and has recently added biotechnology to his coverage. Eric has a Masters of Business Administration degree.

Amanda Lee

Amanda Lee

Beijing-based correspondent Amanda Lee covers markets and the economy for the Post, with an interest in China's economic and social landscape. A graduate of the London School of Economics, she joined the Post in 2017 and has previously worked for Thomson Reuters and Forbes.