Old structures, including statues like this one in 1998, were torn down near Beijing’s Forbidden City as money and power joined hands in property development. Photo: Mark Ralston Old structures, including statues like this one in 1998, were torn down near Beijing’s Forbidden City as money and power joined hands in property development. Photo: Mark Ralston
Old structures, including statues like this one in 1998, were torn down near Beijing’s Forbidden City as money and power joined hands in property development. Photo: Mark Ralston
Zhou Xin
Opinion

Opinion

Zhou Xin

China’s move to protect Beijing’s inner city is a bit late, but still worth welcoming

  • Wholesale bulldozing of communities – a common practice in the development of Chinese cities – has fallen out of favour in the capital
  • Beijing’s new approach to preservation needs to avoid old pitfalls such as kicking locals out to make way for those who can afford more luxurious property

Old structures, including statues like this one in 1998, were torn down near Beijing’s Forbidden City as money and power joined hands in property development. Photo: Mark Ralston Old structures, including statues like this one in 1998, were torn down near Beijing’s Forbidden City as money and power joined hands in property development. Photo: Mark Ralston
Old structures, including statues like this one in 1998, were torn down near Beijing’s Forbidden City as money and power joined hands in property development. Photo: Mark Ralston
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Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin co-leads the political economy team at the Post. He mainly covers economic stories but also writes about Chinese politics and diplomacy. He has previously worked for Reuters and Bloomberg in Beijing.