Farmer Bai (left) points across his flattened cornfield in Heilongjiang province, which was hit by heavy storms in recent weeks. Bai says some fields in the important corn-growing region may not yield any harvest this year. Photo: Orange Wang Farmer Bai (left) points across his flattened cornfield in Heilongjiang province, which was hit by heavy storms in recent weeks. Bai says some fields in the important corn-growing region may not yield any harvest this year. Photo: Orange Wang
Farmer Bai (left) points across his flattened cornfield in Heilongjiang province, which was hit by heavy storms in recent weeks. Bai says some fields in the important corn-growing region may not yield any harvest this year. Photo: Orange Wang

China’s northeastern corn belt left flattened by typhoons, fuelling food-security concerns ahead of autumn harvest

  • Inland typhoon damage and flooding look to cause a big drop in corn harvest in China’s northeast, according to a Post field trip spanning hundreds of miles
  • Reduced corn output could lead to price inflation in other grains such as wheat and might threaten China’s overall grain supply sufficiency as state reserves dwindle

Topic |   China food safety
Farmer Bai (left) points across his flattened cornfield in Heilongjiang province, which was hit by heavy storms in recent weeks. Bai says some fields in the important corn-growing region may not yield any harvest this year. Photo: Orange Wang Farmer Bai (left) points across his flattened cornfield in Heilongjiang province, which was hit by heavy storms in recent weeks. Bai says some fields in the important corn-growing region may not yield any harvest this year. Photo: Orange Wang
Farmer Bai (left) points across his flattened cornfield in Heilongjiang province, which was hit by heavy storms in recent weeks. Bai says some fields in the important corn-growing region may not yield any harvest this year. Photo: Orange Wang
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