Consumer outlays were suppressed during the Lunar New Year holiday in January and the Labour Day holiday in May when the coronavirus was a major concern, but the October holiday was meant to welcome a surge in revenge spending. Photo: EPA-EFE Consumer outlays were suppressed during the Lunar New Year holiday in January and the Labour Day holiday in May when the coronavirus was a major concern, but the October holiday was meant to welcome a surge in revenge spending. Photo: EPA-EFE
Consumer outlays were suppressed during the Lunar New Year holiday in January and the Labour Day holiday in May when the coronavirus was a major concern, but the October holiday was meant to welcome a surge in revenge spending. Photo: EPA-EFE
Zhou Xin
Opinion

Opinion

Zhou Xin

China’s ‘golden week’ consumer spending fails to help Beijing put its best foot forward

  • Figures for tourism income, the number of tourists and average spending all fell in the first four days of October compared to the same period last year
  • China has been able to show a strong recovery from the economic impact of the coronavirus, but consumer spending has lagged behind the manufacturing sector

Consumer outlays were suppressed during the Lunar New Year holiday in January and the Labour Day holiday in May when the coronavirus was a major concern, but the October holiday was meant to welcome a surge in revenge spending. Photo: EPA-EFE Consumer outlays were suppressed during the Lunar New Year holiday in January and the Labour Day holiday in May when the coronavirus was a major concern, but the October holiday was meant to welcome a surge in revenge spending. Photo: EPA-EFE
Consumer outlays were suppressed during the Lunar New Year holiday in January and the Labour Day holiday in May when the coronavirus was a major concern, but the October holiday was meant to welcome a surge in revenge spending. Photo: EPA-EFE
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