Allowing mainland residents to invest in offshore securities and insurance policies would mark a milestone in China’s foreign exchange deregulation and create an institutionalised channel for mainland investors to participate directly in global financial markets. Photo: EPA Allowing mainland residents to invest in offshore securities and insurance policies would mark a milestone in China’s foreign exchange deregulation and create an institutionalised channel for mainland investors to participate directly in global financial markets. Photo: EPA
Allowing mainland residents to invest in offshore securities and insurance policies would mark a milestone in China’s foreign exchange deregulation and create an institutionalised channel for mainland investors to participate directly in global financial markets. Photo: EPA
Zhou Xin
Opinion

Opinion

Zhou Xin

China signals real financial opening up, but will it follow through?

  • Idea of allowing people to change yuan into other currencies and then decide what offshore assets to buy is revolutionary
  • Immediate monetary impact of a relaxation would be limited because many affluent Chinese have invested overseas anyway

Allowing mainland residents to invest in offshore securities and insurance policies would mark a milestone in China’s foreign exchange deregulation and create an institutionalised channel for mainland investors to participate directly in global financial markets. Photo: EPA Allowing mainland residents to invest in offshore securities and insurance policies would mark a milestone in China’s foreign exchange deregulation and create an institutionalised channel for mainland investors to participate directly in global financial markets. Photo: EPA
Allowing mainland residents to invest in offshore securities and insurance policies would mark a milestone in China’s foreign exchange deregulation and create an institutionalised channel for mainland investors to participate directly in global financial markets. Photo: EPA
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Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin co-leads the political economy team at the Post. He mainly covers economic stories but also writes about Chinese politics and diplomacy. He has previously worked for Reuters and Bloomberg in Beijing.