China’s loan prime rate (LPR) is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, but the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates. Photo: AFP China’s loan prime rate (LPR) is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, but the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates. Photo: AFP
China’s loan prime rate (LPR) is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, but the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates. Photo: AFP

China loan rate unchanged despite speculation of further policy easing to support economic growth

  • The loan prime rate (LPR) has been seen as China’s de facto benchmark funding cost since a reform in 2019 and is released on the 20th of each month
  • While the rate is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates

Topic |   China economy
China’s loan prime rate (LPR) is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, but the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates. Photo: AFP China’s loan prime rate (LPR) is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, but the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates. Photo: AFP
China’s loan prime rate (LPR) is technically decided by a group of 18 banks, but the cost is widely regarded to be an indicator for Beijing’s preference on loan rates. Photo: AFP
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