China’s hard technologies, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, are often seen as a symbols of strength, whereas soft technology such as mobile apps tend to be seen more as entertainment. Photo: AP China’s hard technologies, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, are often seen as a symbols of strength, whereas soft technology such as mobile apps tend to be seen more as entertainment. Photo: AP
China’s hard technologies, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, are often seen as a symbols of strength, whereas soft technology such as mobile apps tend to be seen more as entertainment. Photo: AP
Zhou Xin
Opinion

Opinion

Zhou Xin

China’s soft technology power is as important as its physical hardware that launches rockets

  • The argument that China is expending too many resources on soft tech overlooks how intertwined it is with hard tech
  • China can boost its soft power by better embracing products and services that rely on soft technology to improve people’s lives

China’s hard technologies, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, are often seen as a symbols of strength, whereas soft technology such as mobile apps tend to be seen more as entertainment. Photo: AP China’s hard technologies, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, are often seen as a symbols of strength, whereas soft technology such as mobile apps tend to be seen more as entertainment. Photo: AP
China’s hard technologies, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, are often seen as a symbols of strength, whereas soft technology such as mobile apps tend to be seen more as entertainment. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE
Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin

Zhou Xin now leads the technology news team at the Post following stints as Political Economy Editor and Deputy China Editor. He has previously worked for Reuters and Bloomberg in Beijing.