An “administrative monopoly” in China is among the factors that economists believe are standing in the way of Beijing’s plans for a “unified domestic market”. Photo: AP
An “administrative monopoly” in China is among the factors that economists believe are standing in the way of Beijing’s plans for a “unified domestic market”. Photo: AP

China’s market interference keeps it from achieving a ‘unified domestic market’, economists say

  • Experts break down what they see as challenges to Beijing’s recently announced aspirations to build a single market, including an ‘administrative monopoly’
  • Hurdles to realising a single unified market in China, like those seen in the United States and European Union, remain high due to favouritism and local protectionism

An “administrative monopoly” in China is among the factors that economists believe are standing in the way of Beijing’s plans for a “unified domestic market”. Photo: AP
An “administrative monopoly” in China is among the factors that economists believe are standing in the way of Beijing’s plans for a “unified domestic market”. Photo: AP
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