A view of a Xinjiang facility believed to be a re-education camp where mostly Muslim ethnic minorities are detained. The auditing demands of Washington’s new Xinjiang ‘forced labour’ law have raised questions about Chinese firms’ ability to meet the requirements. Photo: AFP
A view of a Xinjiang facility believed to be a re-education camp where mostly Muslim ethnic minorities are detained. The auditing demands of Washington’s new Xinjiang ‘forced labour’ law have raised questions about Chinese firms’ ability to meet the requirements. Photo: AFP
Xinjiang

Xinjiang ‘forced labour’ law leaves Chinese companies in a bind, with doubts over supply chain audits

  • Calls are growing for Beijing to allow independent supply chain audits to meet the requirements a new US law on ‘forced labour’ in Xinjiang
  • US importers cannot gather evidence alone, so the burden of proof has been passed to Chinese companies, who face ‘very high requirements’

A view of a Xinjiang facility believed to be a re-education camp where mostly Muslim ethnic minorities are detained. The auditing demands of Washington’s new Xinjiang ‘forced labour’ law have raised questions about Chinese firms’ ability to meet the requirements. Photo: AFP
A view of a Xinjiang facility believed to be a re-education camp where mostly Muslim ethnic minorities are detained. The auditing demands of Washington’s new Xinjiang ‘forced labour’ law have raised questions about Chinese firms’ ability to meet the requirements. Photo: AFP
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