The SS Ventnor sank off the coast of New Zealand in 1902 while carrying the remains of 499 Chinese gold miners back to China via Hong Kong. The recent discovery of the bones of some in the wreck of the ship has sparked a row over whether they should be left in place or raised for burial in China. Photo: Auckland Library The SS Ventnor sank off the coast of New Zealand in 1902 while carrying the remains of 499 Chinese gold miners back to China via Hong Kong. The recent discovery of the bones of some in the wreck of the ship has sparked a row over whether they should be left in place or raised for burial in China. Photo: Auckland Library
The SS Ventnor sank off the coast of New Zealand in 1902 while carrying the remains of 499 Chinese gold miners back to China via Hong Kong. The recent discovery of the bones of some in the wreck of the ship has sparked a row over whether they should be left in place or raised for burial in China. Photo: Auckland Library
New Zealand

Chinese gold miners’ bones in 1902 New Zealand shipwreck: should they be raised for burial or left under sea now they have been discovered?

  • In 1902 the SS Ventnor, carrying the remain of gold miners back to China, sank in the Tasman Sea. The bones of some have been found in the wreck of the ship
  • The leader of the divers who found them believes they should be brought up and buried in China, but members of New Zealand’s Chinese community don’t agree

Topic |   New Zealand
The SS Ventnor sank off the coast of New Zealand in 1902 while carrying the remains of 499 Chinese gold miners back to China via Hong Kong. The recent discovery of the bones of some in the wreck of the ship has sparked a row over whether they should be left in place or raised for burial in China. Photo: Auckland Library The SS Ventnor sank off the coast of New Zealand in 1902 while carrying the remains of 499 Chinese gold miners back to China via Hong Kong. The recent discovery of the bones of some in the wreck of the ship has sparked a row over whether they should be left in place or raised for burial in China. Photo: Auckland Library
The SS Ventnor sank off the coast of New Zealand in 1902 while carrying the remains of 499 Chinese gold miners back to China via Hong Kong. The recent discovery of the bones of some in the wreck of the ship has sparked a row over whether they should be left in place or raised for burial in China. Photo: Auckland Library
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