Rubbish is piled up in the middle of the street after floods in Barangay Malanday, Marikina City, the Philippines. An average of 20 typhoons a year now hit the country, with flooding devastating many towns and cities. Photo: AJ Bolando Rubbish is piled up in the middle of the street after floods in Barangay Malanday, Marikina City, the Philippines. An average of 20 typhoons a year now hit the country, with flooding devastating many towns and cities. Photo: AJ Bolando
Rubbish is piled up in the middle of the street after floods in Barangay Malanday, Marikina City, the Philippines. An average of 20 typhoons a year now hit the country, with flooding devastating many towns and cities. Photo: AJ Bolando
Extreme weather

As victims of typhoon-prone Philippines’ worst floods in 50 years clean up and rebuild, its disaster-risk management is back under the spotlight

  • Climate change has made the tropical storms that hit the Philippines every year more severe. It has responded by improving warning systems and management plans
  • Yet the plans come to nothing. They aren’t given enough priority, co-ordination and direction are lacking, and laws aren’t enforced, a disaster-risk expert says

Topic |   Extreme weather
Rubbish is piled up in the middle of the street after floods in Barangay Malanday, Marikina City, the Philippines. An average of 20 typhoons a year now hit the country, with flooding devastating many towns and cities. Photo: AJ Bolando Rubbish is piled up in the middle of the street after floods in Barangay Malanday, Marikina City, the Philippines. An average of 20 typhoons a year now hit the country, with flooding devastating many towns and cities. Photo: AJ Bolando
Rubbish is piled up in the middle of the street after floods in Barangay Malanday, Marikina City, the Philippines. An average of 20 typhoons a year now hit the country, with flooding devastating many towns and cities. Photo: AJ Bolando
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