In Japanese, ‘ki’ can mean both tree and wood. If words have different nuances in the same language, do words used to describe emotions vary across different languages too, researchers asked. Photo: Shutterstock In Japanese, ‘ki’ can mean both tree and wood. If words have different nuances in the same language, do words used to describe emotions vary across different languages too, researchers asked. Photo: Shutterstock
In Japanese, ‘ki’ can mean both tree and wood. If words have different nuances in the same language, do words used to describe emotions vary across different languages too, researchers asked. Photo: Shutterstock

Love, anger, joy and hate: how words we use to describe the way we feel differ between languages

  • Researchers have discovered that the way we think of emotions such as anger, fear, and joy depends on our language
  • ‘Surprise’ can be associated with ‘fear’ in one language, for example, and linked to ‘hope’ and ‘want’ in another

Topic |   Science
In Japanese, ‘ki’ can mean both tree and wood. If words have different nuances in the same language, do words used to describe emotions vary across different languages too, researchers asked. Photo: Shutterstock In Japanese, ‘ki’ can mean both tree and wood. If words have different nuances in the same language, do words used to describe emotions vary across different languages too, researchers asked. Photo: Shutterstock
In Japanese, ‘ki’ can mean both tree and wood. If words have different nuances in the same language, do words used to describe emotions vary across different languages too, researchers asked. Photo: Shutterstock
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