Two of three blocks at a quarantine facility in Sai Kung, Hong Kong, built in 77 days using modular integrated construction (MiC). Several pilot projects are under way in the city, a late adopter of factory built homes. Photo: LWK + Partners Two of three blocks at a quarantine facility in Sai Kung, Hong Kong, built in 77 days using modular integrated construction (MiC). Several pilot projects are under way in the city, a late adopter of factory built homes. Photo: LWK + Partners
Two of three blocks at a quarantine facility in Sai Kung, Hong Kong, built in 77 days using modular integrated construction (MiC). Several pilot projects are under way in the city, a late adopter of factory built homes. Photo: LWK + Partners

From temporary housing to luxury high-rises, modular construction is a faster, safer, greener way to build

  • Hong Kong has been slow to adopt modular construction, but it could be key to creating a circular economy and making development sustainable, architect says
  • Because homes are modular they can be reused in another building, thereby reducing waste, and their ease of assembly could ease pressure of ageing workforce

Topic |   Architecture and design
Two of three blocks at a quarantine facility in Sai Kung, Hong Kong, built in 77 days using modular integrated construction (MiC). Several pilot projects are under way in the city, a late adopter of factory built homes. Photo: LWK + Partners Two of three blocks at a quarantine facility in Sai Kung, Hong Kong, built in 77 days using modular integrated construction (MiC). Several pilot projects are under way in the city, a late adopter of factory built homes. Photo: LWK + Partners
Two of three blocks at a quarantine facility in Sai Kung, Hong Kong, built in 77 days using modular integrated construction (MiC). Several pilot projects are under way in the city, a late adopter of factory built homes. Photo: LWK + Partners
READ FULL ARTICLE