Gavin Coates, senior lecturer in landscape architecture at the University of Hong Kong, in Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong. The public use of Hong Kong’s parks, nature reserves and sports fields has helped to offset their heavy environmental cost. Photo: Jonathan Wong
Gavin Coates, senior lecturer in landscape architecture at the University of Hong Kong, in Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong. The public use of Hong Kong’s parks, nature reserves and sports fields has helped to offset their heavy environmental cost. Photo: Jonathan Wong
Environment

Lawns are a thirsty luxury for many amid climate change, yet Hong Kong’s, well used by the public, survive

  • Hong Kong is a world leader in restricting lawns to socially useful areas that can most benefit the public, which helps offset their huge environmental cost
  • Elsewhere, especially in drier regions, cities are encouraging or mandating their removal to save water and encourage greater biodiversity

Gavin Coates, senior lecturer in landscape architecture at the University of Hong Kong, in Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong. The public use of Hong Kong’s parks, nature reserves and sports fields has helped to offset their heavy environmental cost. Photo: Jonathan Wong
Gavin Coates, senior lecturer in landscape architecture at the University of Hong Kong, in Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong. The public use of Hong Kong’s parks, nature reserves and sports fields has helped to offset their heavy environmental cost. Photo: Jonathan Wong
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