One of the last traditional Chinese lantern makers in Hong Kong, Ha Chung-kin works on an order at his shop in Sai Ying Pun. He thinks the local lantern-making industry will be dead within 40 years. Photo: Nora Tam
One of the last traditional Chinese lantern makers in Hong Kong, Ha Chung-kin works on an order at his shop in Sai Ying Pun. He thinks the local lantern-making industry will be dead within 40 years. Photo: Nora Tam

Lantern maker for Mid-Autumn Festival in Hong Kong loves the job, but doubts it has a future with city’s cultural heritage under threat

  • Ha Chung-kin has made lanterns the traditional way for 34 years, and takes inspiration for designs from events, such as a Chinese rocket launch, and daily life
  • Despite his enthusiasm for the centuries-old Chinese craft, Ha sees a grim future for the art form in Hong Kong, where he is one of the few lantern makers left

One of the last traditional Chinese lantern makers in Hong Kong, Ha Chung-kin works on an order at his shop in Sai Ying Pun. He thinks the local lantern-making industry will be dead within 40 years. Photo: Nora Tam
One of the last traditional Chinese lantern makers in Hong Kong, Ha Chung-kin works on an order at his shop in Sai Ying Pun. He thinks the local lantern-making industry will be dead within 40 years. Photo: Nora Tam
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