Jewish refugees in Hong Kong celebrate Yom Kippur at The Peninsula hotel in 1946. After World War II ended, the hotel became a temporary home to Jews en route to other destinations. Photo: Fred Antman and the Hong Kong Heritage Project
Jewish refugees in Hong Kong celebrate Yom Kippur at The Peninsula hotel in 1946. After World War II ended, the hotel became a temporary home to Jews en route to other destinations. Photo: Fred Antman and the Hong Kong Heritage Project

Why Jewish refugees in World War II Hong Kong endured torrid times, as new research reveals their complicated stories

  • Hong Kong was primarily a port of transit for Jewish refugees during the war, but they faced discrimination both as refugees and for their nationalities
  • An exhibit by the Goethe-Institut Hong Kong unveils new research from the Hong Kong Heritage Project on refugees’ experiences in the city during that period

Jewish refugees in Hong Kong celebrate Yom Kippur at The Peninsula hotel in 1946. After World War II ended, the hotel became a temporary home to Jews en route to other destinations. Photo: Fred Antman and the Hong Kong Heritage Project
Jewish refugees in Hong Kong celebrate Yom Kippur at The Peninsula hotel in 1946. After World War II ended, the hotel became a temporary home to Jews en route to other destinations. Photo: Fred Antman and the Hong Kong Heritage Project
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