Wang Lin, partner at Spring Capital and a patron of Today Art Museum in Beijing, China, at the museum. Photo: Simon Song
Wang Lin, partner at Spring Capital and a patron of Today Art Museum in Beijing, China, at the museum. Photo: Simon Song
Art

How China’s private art museums are seeking patrons to survive, and the wealthy art lovers paying big money for exclusive perks

  • Private museums in China built by property developers in return for tax breaks and other benefits are feeling the effect of the country’s real estate crisis
  • One art collector says the nearly US$16,000 she pays a year to be a patron of Beijing’s Today Art Museum is good value for what she gets out of it

Wang Lin, partner at Spring Capital and a patron of Today Art Museum in Beijing, China, at the museum. Photo: Simon Song
Wang Lin, partner at Spring Capital and a patron of Today Art Museum in Beijing, China, at the museum. Photo: Simon Song

Corrected [1:02pm, 27 Jan, 2022]

  • [1:02pm, 27 Jan, 2022]

    The English translation of comments from Wang Lin and Jessica Zhang, originally made in Mandarin, have been amended after discussion with Today Art Museum.

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