Jimmy Wang Yu (left) and Violet Pang in a still from One-Armed Swordsman (1967), directed by Chang Cheh, one of the most influential Hong Kong martial arts film directors. Jimmy Wang Yu (left) and Violet Pang in a still from One-Armed Swordsman (1967), directed by Chang Cheh, one of the most influential Hong Kong martial arts film directors.
Jimmy Wang Yu (left) and Violet Pang in a still from One-Armed Swordsman (1967), directed by Chang Cheh, one of the most influential Hong Kong martial arts film directors.

The director who revolutionised martial arts movies by making his male characters warriors instead of weaklings

  • Chang Cheh modernised wuxia films in the 1960s by making men, rather than women, the action heroes and adding violence and bloodshed to screenplays
  • The male bonding and transcendental violence in later John Woo films can be traced back to Chang’s work; Woo was one of many directors influenced by his films

Topic |   Asian cinema: Hong Kong film
Jimmy Wang Yu (left) and Violet Pang in a still from One-Armed Swordsman (1967), directed by Chang Cheh, one of the most influential Hong Kong martial arts film directors. Jimmy Wang Yu (left) and Violet Pang in a still from One-Armed Swordsman (1967), directed by Chang Cheh, one of the most influential Hong Kong martial arts film directors.
Jimmy Wang Yu (left) and Violet Pang in a still from One-Armed Swordsman (1967), directed by Chang Cheh, one of the most influential Hong Kong martial arts film directors.
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