Vincent Zhao in a still from The Blade (1995), directed by Tsui Hark. The characters’ nihilism put off cinema-goers already bored with wuxia films, making this Tsui’s most underappreciated masterpiece. Vincent Zhao in a still from The Blade (1995), directed by Tsui Hark. The characters’ nihilism put off cinema-goers already bored with wuxia films, making this Tsui’s most underappreciated masterpiece.
Vincent Zhao in a still from The Blade (1995), directed by Tsui Hark. The characters’ nihilism put off cinema-goers already bored with wuxia films, making this Tsui’s most underappreciated masterpiece.

The Blade, Tsui Hark’s nihilistic 1995 wuxia movie, may be the director’s least appreciated martial arts masterpiece

  • Tsui’s film throws out the chivalry of the martial arts subculture and depicts in starkly realist style fighters who are cruel and barbaric
  • He worked without a script, asking the cast to act out their character’s feelings, and didn’t choreograph fights. One critic called it a ‘stunning achievement’

Topic |   Asian cinema: Hong Kong film
Vincent Zhao in a still from The Blade (1995), directed by Tsui Hark. The characters’ nihilism put off cinema-goers already bored with wuxia films, making this Tsui’s most underappreciated masterpiece. Vincent Zhao in a still from The Blade (1995), directed by Tsui Hark. The characters’ nihilism put off cinema-goers already bored with wuxia films, making this Tsui’s most underappreciated masterpiece.
Vincent Zhao in a still from The Blade (1995), directed by Tsui Hark. The characters’ nihilism put off cinema-goers already bored with wuxia films, making this Tsui’s most underappreciated masterpiece.
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