Lo Mang in a still from The Five Venoms (1978). The cartoonish style of this and other Venom Mob films directed by Chang Cheh, and their acrobatic fight scenes, went down well with North American audiences, if not  with Hong Kong film critics. Lo Mang in a still from The Five Venoms (1978). The cartoonish style of this and other Venom Mob films directed by Chang Cheh, and their acrobatic fight scenes, went down well with North American audiences, if not  with Hong Kong film critics.
Lo Mang in a still from The Five Venoms (1978). The cartoonish style of this and other Venom Mob films directed by Chang Cheh, and their acrobatic fight scenes, went down well with North American audiences, if not with Hong Kong film critics.

How Chang Cheh’s Venom Mob martial arts films, starting with 1978’s The Five Venoms, became cult favourites in the West

  • The storylines were gory and cartoon-like, the fight scenes anything but realistic and the costumes flashy – but overseas audiences loved the Venom Mob films
  • The freedom the films gave Chang to be creative with fight scenes and storytelling made him a more imaginative director, says an expert on Asian film

Topic |   Asian cinema: Hong Kong film
Lo Mang in a still from The Five Venoms (1978). The cartoonish style of this and other Venom Mob films directed by Chang Cheh, and their acrobatic fight scenes, went down well with North American audiences, if not  with Hong Kong film critics. Lo Mang in a still from The Five Venoms (1978). The cartoonish style of this and other Venom Mob films directed by Chang Cheh, and their acrobatic fight scenes, went down well with North American audiences, if not  with Hong Kong film critics.
Lo Mang in a still from The Five Venoms (1978). The cartoonish style of this and other Venom Mob films directed by Chang Cheh, and their acrobatic fight scenes, went down well with North American audiences, if not with Hong Kong film critics.
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