Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams in a scene from The Notebook (2004). The relationship between the two main characters, portrayed as some kind of epic romance, can easily be viewed as a toxic one.
Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams in a scene from The Notebook (2004). The relationship between the two main characters, portrayed as some kind of epic romance, can easily be viewed as a toxic one.
Ginny Wong
Opinion

Opinion

Ginny Wong

End your toxic relationship with romance – love doesn’t have to be a roller-coaster ride like in The Notebook or a Disney film

  • We’ve been conditioned to believe that true love involves overcoming great trials, a fantasy that has long been perpetuated by the media
  • There are signs we’re waking up – in South Korean dramas, ‘second lead syndrome’ denotes when viewers fall for the nice, supportive guy who doesn’t get the girl

Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams in a scene from The Notebook (2004). The relationship between the two main characters, portrayed as some kind of epic romance, can easily be viewed as a toxic one.
Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams in a scene from The Notebook (2004). The relationship between the two main characters, portrayed as some kind of epic romance, can easily be viewed as a toxic one.
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