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Fashion

Six influential Asian women whose lives are as fabulous as their wardrobes

  • A tycoon’s daughter, debutante, quirky fashionista, skin specialist – no matter what these women do, they never look less than perfect
  • They come from Malaysia, Japan, the Philippines, China and Canada
PUBLISHED : Friday, 28 December, 2018, 8:49am
UPDATED : Friday, 28 December, 2018, 8:48am

From a Chinese heiress who made her debut into high society in Paris to the daughter of a Malaysian tycoon and a celebrity skin doctor from the Philippines, these fabulous women from Asia and beyond lead very fashionable lives.

Chryseis Tan, Malaysia

Daughter of Malaysian tycoon Vincent Tan, Chryseis is not your average Instagram rich kid and is carving out a niche in her family’s Berjaya business. She makes smart use of social media to spread awareness about her ventures.

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Annabel Yao, China

Yao, who was chosen to perform the opening waltz at Le Bal des Débutantes in Paris, was one of 19 young women to make their society debut this year. The Harvard computer science student and ballerina says, ‘As much as I enjoy coding … I have a passion for fashion, PR and entertainment’.

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Eriko Yagi, Japan

Yagi’s playful sense of style is hard to miss on the streets of Tokyo and at Milan Fashion Week. One entire floor of Yagi’s house is used as her own personal wardrobe.

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Vicki Belo, the Philippines

The celebrity dermatologist to the glitterati of East Asia and the Middle East has watched how cosmetic surgery has gone from secret to status symbol, and she has become a global authority on now to treat Asian skin.

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Wendy Yu, China

Vogue’s Anna Wintour and Met curator Andrew Bolton played key roles in Yu’s multimillion-dollar endowment and plays a major role in Yu’s plans to boost China’s fashion industry.

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Chelsea Jiang, Vancouver

When the tap that pours almost unlimited funds gets turned off, changes have to be made. For some second-generation rich kids, that means getting into things such as real estate and wine making.

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