An employee holds a rough mined diamond at a factory in Moscow. Jewellery company Pandora’s decision to use only lab-grown diamonds on ethical grounds prompted pushback from diamond miners who say millions of people depend on income and welfare from mining the precious stones. Photo: Reuters
An employee holds a rough mined diamond at a factory in Moscow. Jewellery company Pandora’s decision to use only lab-grown diamonds on ethical grounds prompted pushback from diamond miners who say millions of people depend on income and welfare from mining the precious stones. Photo: Reuters

Pandora says lab-grown diamonds the ethical choice. Not so, say diamond miners. Who’s right?

  • Tobias Kormind, of online retailer 77 Diamonds, says diamond miners have largely eliminated shady dealings, and notes that lab-grown stones need a lot of power
  • Still, he credits Pandora for a decision he believes is born both of a commitment to sustainability and economic opportunity as lab-grown diamond prices fall

An employee holds a rough mined diamond at a factory in Moscow. Jewellery company Pandora’s decision to use only lab-grown diamonds on ethical grounds prompted pushback from diamond miners who say millions of people depend on income and welfare from mining the precious stones. Photo: Reuters
An employee holds a rough mined diamond at a factory in Moscow. Jewellery company Pandora’s decision to use only lab-grown diamonds on ethical grounds prompted pushback from diamond miners who say millions of people depend on income and welfare from mining the precious stones. Photo: Reuters
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