Ram-don, or jjapaguri, might not typically be served with marbled sirloin like it is in the film Parasite, but the dish is still a common one in a country that embraces its love of instant noodles.Ram-don, or jjapaguri, might not typically be served with marbled sirloin like it is in the film Parasite, but the dish is still a common one in a country that embraces its love of instant noodles.
Ram-don, or jjapaguri, might not typically be served with marbled sirloin like it is in the film Parasite, but the dish is still a common one in a country that embraces its love of instant noodles.

Those ram-don noodles from Parasite: a cheap noodle treat popular with students and not usually found on restaurant menus

  • The World Instant Noodles Association says the average South Korean eats 74 packets of instant noodles a year, making them world’s largest consumers per capita
  • High-end US restaurants added ram-don, or jjapaguri, to their menus, but in Korea you eat it ‘because you either don’t have a lot of time or a lot of money’
Topic |   Eat Drink Asia Podcast
Ram-don, or jjapaguri, might not typically be served with marbled sirloin like it is in the film Parasite, but the dish is still a common one in a country that embraces its love of instant noodles.Ram-don, or jjapaguri, might not typically be served with marbled sirloin like it is in the film Parasite, but the dish is still a common one in a country that embraces its love of instant noodles.
Ram-don, or jjapaguri, might not typically be served with marbled sirloin like it is in the film Parasite, but the dish is still a common one in a country that embraces its love of instant noodles.
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