Hnin Yee Htun in a market in Yangon, Myanmar. She overcame separation from her family during Burma’s 8888 Uprising and life as a refugee to be a successful culinary director, specialising in traditional Burmese food. Photo: Kenji Photography Hnin Yee Htun in a market in Yangon, Myanmar. She overcame separation from her family during Burma’s 8888 Uprising and life as a refugee to be a successful culinary director, specialising in traditional Burmese food. Photo: Kenji Photography
Hnin Yee Htun in a market in Yangon, Myanmar. She overcame separation from her family during Burma’s 8888 Uprising and life as a refugee to be a successful culinary director, specialising in traditional Burmese food. Photo: Kenji Photography

Burmese food expert on her ‘unusual life’ – she met her parents when she was 12, emigrated to Australia, then returned to Myanmar and opened a restaurant

  • Born on the eve of popular revolt in Burma in 1988, Hnin Yee Htun did not see her parents for 12 years until they were reunited in a refugee camp in Thailand
  • Educated in Australia, she went back to army-ruled Myanmar, and opened a restaurant; she’s now helped introduce a taste of Burmese cuisine to a friend’s restaurant in Hong Kong

Topic |   Food and Drinks
Hnin Yee Htun in a market in Yangon, Myanmar. She overcame separation from her family during Burma’s 8888 Uprising and life as a refugee to be a successful culinary director, specialising in traditional Burmese food. Photo: Kenji Photography Hnin Yee Htun in a market in Yangon, Myanmar. She overcame separation from her family during Burma’s 8888 Uprising and life as a refugee to be a successful culinary director, specialising in traditional Burmese food. Photo: Kenji Photography
Hnin Yee Htun in a market in Yangon, Myanmar. She overcame separation from her family during Burma’s 8888 Uprising and life as a refugee to be a successful culinary director, specialising in traditional Burmese food. Photo: Kenji Photography
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