Kebabs being cooked at the Tunday Kababi restaurant in Lucknow, India, known for its version of the galouti kebab – so soft a king with no teeth could get fat on them. Photo: AFP Kebabs being cooked at the Tunday Kababi restaurant in Lucknow, India, known for its version of the galouti kebab – so soft a king with no teeth could get fat on them. Photo: AFP
Kebabs being cooked at the Tunday Kababi restaurant in Lucknow, India, known for its version of the galouti kebab – so soft a king with no teeth could get fat on them. Photo: AFP
Food and Drinks

A kebab fit for a king, how the shish kebab got its name, and the kebab whose name means ‘belly full’

  • The galouti kebab owes its origins to an Indian monarch who lost all his teeth and ordered his cooks to come up with a kebab soft enough for him to eat
  • Shish kebabs owe their name to the Persian traders who would cook chunks of meat over camp fires on the ends of their swords – called shish in their language

Topic |   Food and Drinks
Kebabs being cooked at the Tunday Kababi restaurant in Lucknow, India, known for its version of the galouti kebab – so soft a king with no teeth could get fat on them. Photo: AFP Kebabs being cooked at the Tunday Kababi restaurant in Lucknow, India, known for its version of the galouti kebab – so soft a king with no teeth could get fat on them. Photo: AFP
Kebabs being cooked at the Tunday Kababi restaurant in Lucknow, India, known for its version of the galouti kebab – so soft a king with no teeth could get fat on them. Photo: AFP
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