Restaurants are already struggling to stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic, coping with restrictions on capacity and opening hours. Should food critics rein in their highly critical food reviews? Photo: Edmond So Restaurants are already struggling to stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic, coping with restrictions on capacity and opening hours. Should food critics rein in their highly critical food reviews? Photo: Edmond So
Restaurants are already struggling to stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic, coping with restrictions on capacity and opening hours. Should food critics rein in their highly critical food reviews? Photo: Edmond So
Susan Jung
Opinion

Opinion

Feast or Famine by Susan Jung

Why food reviewers should think twice about spitting venom when restaurants are going under during the coronavirus pandemic

  • A food critic’s recent article celebrating the closure of a Thomas Keller restaurant has started a fierce debate
  • Should critics be savaging restaurants when so many are closing due to the Covid-19 pandemic?

Restaurants are already struggling to stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic, coping with restrictions on capacity and opening hours. Should food critics rein in their highly critical food reviews? Photo: Edmond So Restaurants are already struggling to stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic, coping with restrictions on capacity and opening hours. Should food critics rein in their highly critical food reviews? Photo: Edmond So
Restaurants are already struggling to stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic, coping with restrictions on capacity and opening hours. Should food critics rein in their highly critical food reviews? Photo: Edmond So
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Susan Jung

Susan Jung

Susan Jung trained as a pastry chef and worked in hotels, restaurants and bakeries in San Francisco, New York and Hong Kong before joining the Post. She is academy chair for Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan for the World's 50 Best Restaurants and Asia's 50 Best Restaurants.