Theresa Mak, founder of Chinese food product retailer Dashijie, cooks radish cake at Maxim’s Centre in Cheung Sha Wan. She is one of a number of chefs in Hong Kong trying to keep Cantonese culinary traditions alive. Photo: K.Y. Cheng Theresa Mak, founder of Chinese food product retailer Dashijie, cooks radish cake at Maxim’s Centre in Cheung Sha Wan. She is one of a number of chefs in Hong Kong trying to keep Cantonese culinary traditions alive. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
Theresa Mak, founder of Chinese food product retailer Dashijie, cooks radish cake at Maxim’s Centre in Cheung Sha Wan. She is one of a number of chefs in Hong Kong trying to keep Cantonese culinary traditions alive. Photo: K.Y. Cheng

Chefs keeping traditional Cantonese cuisine alive the hard way – by evolving dishes while keeping to their roots

  • ‘I hate it when restaurants put foie gras or truffle on Cantonese food,’ chef Danny Yip says, who doesn’t like to lose a dish’s spirit when improving on it
  • But young people don’t want to learn time-consuming traditional skills, chef Margaret Xu says; modern Western cooking techniques could help

Topic |   Food and Drinks
Theresa Mak, founder of Chinese food product retailer Dashijie, cooks radish cake at Maxim’s Centre in Cheung Sha Wan. She is one of a number of chefs in Hong Kong trying to keep Cantonese culinary traditions alive. Photo: K.Y. Cheng Theresa Mak, founder of Chinese food product retailer Dashijie, cooks radish cake at Maxim’s Centre in Cheung Sha Wan. She is one of a number of chefs in Hong Kong trying to keep Cantonese culinary traditions alive. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
Theresa Mak, founder of Chinese food product retailer Dashijie, cooks radish cake at Maxim’s Centre in Cheung Sha Wan. She is one of a number of chefs in Hong Kong trying to keep Cantonese culinary traditions alive. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
READ FULL ARTICLE