Twitter blew up recently in defence of women who write online recipes after a site wanted to publish their recipes without ads or backstories. Photo: Shutterstock Twitter blew up recently in defence of women who write online recipes after a site wanted to publish their recipes without ads or backstories. Photo: Shutterstock
Twitter blew up recently in defence of women who write online recipes after a site wanted to publish their recipes without ads or backstories. Photo: Shutterstock
Susan Jung
Opinion

Opinion

Feast or Famine by Susan Jung

Twitter post about ‘fixing’ online recipes by removing backstories and ads missed the point

  • Social media reacted mostly with anger to the proposal to post recipes without the writers’ stories about them, or ads – and rightly so
  • Ads help food bloggers monetise their work, and many followers are interested in the stories behind recipes

Twitter blew up recently in defence of women who write online recipes after a site wanted to publish their recipes without ads or backstories. Photo: Shutterstock Twitter blew up recently in defence of women who write online recipes after a site wanted to publish their recipes without ads or backstories. Photo: Shutterstock
Twitter blew up recently in defence of women who write online recipes after a site wanted to publish their recipes without ads or backstories. Photo: Shutterstock
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Susan Jung

Susan Jung

Susan Jung trained as a pastry chef and worked in hotels, restaurants and bakeries in San Francisco, New York and Hong Kong before joining the Post. She is academy chair for Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan for the World's 50 Best Restaurants and Asia's 50 Best Restaurants.