Robby Cheung (middle), co-owner of Tung Po Kitchen, toasts with customers on its second to last night of business. While rules were doubtless broken, the severity of the punishment n forcing it to shut highlights Hong Kong’s problem with blind bureaucracy. Photo: Dickson Lee
Robby Cheung (middle), co-owner of Tung Po Kitchen, toasts with customers on its second to last night of business. While rules were doubtless broken, the severity of the punishment n forcing it to shut highlights Hong Kong’s problem with blind bureaucracy. Photo: Dickson Lee
Andrew Sun
Opinion

Opinion

Mouthing Off by Andrew Sun

Hong Kong’s Tung Po food stall closure is bad for the city – we need rules, but wouldn’t a slap on the wrist have been better?

  • Tung Po Kitchen, in North Point, was closed by authorities on September 2, but did anyone consider the negative impact of erasing this top culinary attraction?
  • Jobs losses and the demise of another food institution highlight Hong Kong’s red tape obsession, with bureaucrats following rules blindly and without empathy

Robby Cheung (middle), co-owner of Tung Po Kitchen, toasts with customers on its second to last night of business. While rules were doubtless broken, the severity of the punishment n forcing it to shut highlights Hong Kong’s problem with blind bureaucracy. Photo: Dickson Lee
Robby Cheung (middle), co-owner of Tung Po Kitchen, toasts with customers on its second to last night of business. While rules were doubtless broken, the severity of the punishment n forcing it to shut highlights Hong Kong’s problem with blind bureaucracy. Photo: Dickson Lee
READ FULL ARTICLE