Popular Hong Kong foods and their sugar content

How much sugar is hidden in your favourite snacks and drinks?

PUBLISHED : Monday, 18 January, 2016, 2:02am
UPDATED : Monday, 18 January, 2016, 12:32pm

The World Health Organisation set new guidelines last year recommending adults and children reduce their daily intake of free sugars to less than 10 per cent of their total energy intake. For a 2,000-calorie diet, this means sugars should make up no more than 200 calories daily, equivalent to 50 grams or 12.5 teaspoons of sugar (four grams of sugar equals one teaspoon). Here’s a guide to some popular Hong Kong food and drinks that would cause you to easily bust that daily sugar limit.

READ MORE: Traditional Hong Kong foodstuffs in the firing line in war on sugar

FOOD & DRINKS

Steamed egg custard bun

28g of sugar per 100g

(13g per bun)

Egg tart

19g of sugar per 100g

(4.9g per tart)

Mai-lai cake

17g of sugar per 100g

(21g per serve)

Cocktail bun

15g of sugar per 100g

(13g per bun)

Steamed barbecue pork bun (cha siu bao)

14g of sugar per 100g

(7.7g per bun)

Tuna fish bun

14g of sugar per 100g

(12g per bun)

Mango pudding

13g of sugar per 100g

(24g per serve)

Pineapple bun

13g of sugar per 100g

(11g per bun)

Red bean iced drink

13g of sugar per 100g

(45g per serve)

Coca-Cola

10.6g of sugar per 100ml (about 100g)

(35g per can)

Sweet and sour pork

10.5g of sugar per 100g

(24g per cup)

Sesame dessert

9.4g of sugar per 100g

(27g per serve)

Steamed bun with assorted filling (dai bao)

9.3g of sugar per 100g

(22g per bun)

Deep-fried meat dumpling

8.4g of sugar per 100g

(4.1g per dumpling)

CONDIMENTS

Plum sauce

55g of sugar per 100g

Hoisin sauce

27g of sugar per 100g

Black bean sauce

15.2g of sugar per 100g

Oyster sauce

8g of sugar per 100g

Source: Centre for Food Safety