Electrolyte supplements have never been shown to prevent illness or even improve performance, says Grant Lipman, professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Photo: Getty Images Electrolyte supplements have never been shown to prevent illness or even improve performance, says Grant Lipman, professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Photo: Getty Images
Electrolyte supplements have never been shown to prevent illness or even improve performance, says Grant Lipman, professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Photo: Getty Images

Pre-workout electrolyte drinks don’t improve performance, can be dangerous, scientists say

  • The promotion of electrolyte supplements as a way of preventing nausea and cramping, and improving performance, is misleading, new report says
  • Longer training distances, lower body mass and avoiding overhydration said to be the most effective ways to prevent electrolyte imbalances

Topic |   Wellness
Electrolyte supplements have never been shown to prevent illness or even improve performance, says Grant Lipman, professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Photo: Getty Images Electrolyte supplements have never been shown to prevent illness or even improve performance, says Grant Lipman, professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Photo: Getty Images
Electrolyte supplements have never been shown to prevent illness or even improve performance, says Grant Lipman, professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Photo: Getty Images
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