New research into coronavirus mutations may explain why early outbreaks in some parts of the world did not end up overwhelming health systems as much as other outbreaks in New York and Italy. Photo: ShutterstockNew research into coronavirus mutations may explain why early outbreaks in some parts of the world did not end up overwhelming health systems as much as other outbreaks in New York and Italy. Photo: Shutterstock
New research into coronavirus mutations may explain why early outbreaks in some parts of the world did not end up overwhelming health systems as much as other outbreaks in New York and Italy. Photo: Shutterstock

Coronavirus mutation makes it even more infectious and is emerging as the dominant kind, research finds

  • A mutation that increases the number of ‘spikes’ in the new coronavirus can significantly increase its ability to infect cells, a new study shows
  • This may explain why early outbreaks were not as overwhelming as those in New York and Italy
Topic |   Wellness
New research into coronavirus mutations may explain why early outbreaks in some parts of the world did not end up overwhelming health systems as much as other outbreaks in New York and Italy. Photo: ShutterstockNew research into coronavirus mutations may explain why early outbreaks in some parts of the world did not end up overwhelming health systems as much as other outbreaks in New York and Italy. Photo: Shutterstock
New research into coronavirus mutations may explain why early outbreaks in some parts of the world did not end up overwhelming health systems as much as other outbreaks in New York and Italy. Photo: Shutterstock
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