When a tumour kills normal cells, those cells release their DNA into the bloodstream – and that DNA could identify the affected tissue, a team of researchers has discovered. Photo: Shutterstock When a tumour kills normal cells, those cells release their DNA into the bloodstream – and that DNA could identify the affected tissue, a team of researchers has discovered. Photo: Shutterstock
When a tumour kills normal cells, those cells release their DNA into the bloodstream – and that DNA could identify the affected tissue, a team of researchers has discovered. Photo: Shutterstock

Early cancer detection: new blood test finds disease years before standard diagnosis – ‘We made this discovery by accident’

  • The test found five types of cancers in 91 per cent of people who were asymptomatic when their blood was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later
  • ‘The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors,’ says study co-author

Topic |   Wellness
When a tumour kills normal cells, those cells release their DNA into the bloodstream – and that DNA could identify the affected tissue, a team of researchers has discovered. Photo: Shutterstock When a tumour kills normal cells, those cells release their DNA into the bloodstream – and that DNA could identify the affected tissue, a team of researchers has discovered. Photo: Shutterstock
When a tumour kills normal cells, those cells release their DNA into the bloodstream – and that DNA could identify the affected tissue, a team of researchers has discovered. Photo: Shutterstock
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