A woman with diabetes gives herself an insulin injection. Diabetics have been given new hope by an experiment in which human stem cells were induced to produce insulin and transplanted into mice, where they regulated blood glucose. Photo: Shutterstock A woman with diabetes gives herself an insulin injection. Diabetics have been given new hope by an experiment in which human stem cells were induced to produce insulin and transplanted into mice, where they regulated blood glucose. Photo: Shutterstock
A woman with diabetes gives herself an insulin injection. Diabetics have been given new hope by an experiment in which human stem cells were induced to produce insulin and transplanted into mice, where they regulated blood glucose. Photo: Shutterstock
Wellness

Diabetes treatment hopes rise with stem cell success in mice – the cells were induced to produce insulin

  • Human cells that make insulin and regulate blood glucose when transplanted into diabetic mice bring hope for type-1 diabetes sufferers
  • The breakthrough, which has been a decade in the making, is still years away from producing a treatment for diabetes in humans, however

Topic |   Wellness
A woman with diabetes gives herself an insulin injection. Diabetics have been given new hope by an experiment in which human stem cells were induced to produce insulin and transplanted into mice, where they regulated blood glucose. Photo: Shutterstock A woman with diabetes gives herself an insulin injection. Diabetics have been given new hope by an experiment in which human stem cells were induced to produce insulin and transplanted into mice, where they regulated blood glucose. Photo: Shutterstock
A woman with diabetes gives herself an insulin injection. Diabetics have been given new hope by an experiment in which human stem cells were induced to produce insulin and transplanted into mice, where they regulated blood glucose. Photo: Shutterstock
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