French adventurer and scientist Michel Siffre is helped away by two gendarmes after spending two months alone in a subterranean cave in southern France in 1962. The social isolation and loneliness he experienced is similar to what many are enduring today during Covid-19, but new apps are trying to keep people connected. Photo: Getty Images French adventurer and scientist Michel Siffre is helped away by two gendarmes after spending two months alone in a subterranean cave in southern France in 1962. The social isolation and loneliness he experienced is similar to what many are enduring today during Covid-19, but new apps are trying to keep people connected. Photo: Getty Images
French adventurer and scientist Michel Siffre is helped away by two gendarmes after spending two months alone in a subterranean cave in southern France in 1962. The social isolation and loneliness he experienced is similar to what many are enduring today during Covid-19, but new apps are trying to keep people connected. Photo: Getty Images

Apps to keep you connected in coronavirus lockdown, for serious conversations and finding a pen-pal – or a shoulder to cry on

  • QuarantineChat allows users to virtually travel and talk with strangers in another country. Slowly! revives the old-fashioned hobby of having a pen-pal
  • Headspace has a library of meditations you can try, while HearMe helps those feeling anxious or lonely to connect with volunteer listeners

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
French adventurer and scientist Michel Siffre is helped away by two gendarmes after spending two months alone in a subterranean cave in southern France in 1962. The social isolation and loneliness he experienced is similar to what many are enduring today during Covid-19, but new apps are trying to keep people connected. Photo: Getty Images French adventurer and scientist Michel Siffre is helped away by two gendarmes after spending two months alone in a subterranean cave in southern France in 1962. The social isolation and loneliness he experienced is similar to what many are enduring today during Covid-19, but new apps are trying to keep people connected. Photo: Getty Images
French adventurer and scientist Michel Siffre is helped away by two gendarmes after spending two months alone in a subterranean cave in southern France in 1962. The social isolation and loneliness he experienced is similar to what many are enduring today during Covid-19, but new apps are trying to keep people connected. Photo: Getty Images
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