Japan’s traditional drinking culture extends into business, and people who don’t consume alcoholic drinks often feel left out and discriminated against. Times are changing, though, and alcohol-free bars are growing in popularity. Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP Japan’s traditional drinking culture extends into business, and people who don’t consume alcoholic drinks often feel left out and discriminated against. Times are changing, though, and alcohol-free bars are growing in popularity. Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP
Japan’s traditional drinking culture extends into business, and people who don’t consume alcoholic drinks often feel left out and discriminated against. Times are changing, though, and alcohol-free bars are growing in popularity. Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP

In hard-drinking Japan, alcohol-free drinks meet growing demand from the ‘sober curious’ and teetotallers

  • Japan’s culture of drinking, especially in the business world, often discriminates against non-drinkers
  • Alcohol-free bars are rare but growing in popularity, mixing non-alcoholic cocktails for the ‘sober curious’ – drinkers who have decided to cut back

Topic |   Wellness
Japan’s traditional drinking culture extends into business, and people who don’t consume alcoholic drinks often feel left out and discriminated against. Times are changing, though, and alcohol-free bars are growing in popularity. Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP Japan’s traditional drinking culture extends into business, and people who don’t consume alcoholic drinks often feel left out and discriminated against. Times are changing, though, and alcohol-free bars are growing in popularity. Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP
Japan’s traditional drinking culture extends into business, and people who don’t consume alcoholic drinks often feel left out and discriminated against. Times are changing, though, and alcohol-free bars are growing in popularity. Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP
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