A model smokes an electronic cigarette during the Beijing International Vapor Distribution Alliance Expo. In a recent study, people who vaped showed more changes in the genes that fight off viruses than people who do not smoke. Photo: Getty Images A model smokes an electronic cigarette during the Beijing International Vapor Distribution Alliance Expo. In a recent study, people who vaped showed more changes in the genes that fight off viruses than people who do not smoke. Photo: Getty Images
A model smokes an electronic cigarette during the Beijing International Vapor Distribution Alliance Expo. In a recent study, people who vaped showed more changes in the genes that fight off viruses than people who do not smoke. Photo: Getty Images

Vaping affects how body reacts to flu viruses like Covid-19, study suggests – sometimes even more than regular smoking

  • People who smoke e-cigarettes show a suppression of immune genes critical for defence against flu viruses, researchers have found
  • Results also raise questions as to whether vaccines would be as effective among e-cigarette users

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
A model smokes an electronic cigarette during the Beijing International Vapor Distribution Alliance Expo. In a recent study, people who vaped showed more changes in the genes that fight off viruses than people who do not smoke. Photo: Getty Images A model smokes an electronic cigarette during the Beijing International Vapor Distribution Alliance Expo. In a recent study, people who vaped showed more changes in the genes that fight off viruses than people who do not smoke. Photo: Getty Images
A model smokes an electronic cigarette during the Beijing International Vapor Distribution Alliance Expo. In a recent study, people who vaped showed more changes in the genes that fight off viruses than people who do not smoke. Photo: Getty Images
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