Tens of thousands of people perform tai chi to mark the first anniversary of the opening of the Beijing Olympics in 2009. The ancient Chinese martial art, widely practised around the world, has been granted intangible cultural heritage status by the United Nations’ cultural arm, Unesco. Photo: AP
Tens of thousands of people perform tai chi to mark the first anniversary of the opening of the Beijing Olympics in 2009. The ancient Chinese martial art, widely practised around the world, has been granted intangible cultural heritage status by the United Nations’ cultural arm, Unesco. Photo: AP

Tai chi added to Unesco intangible cultural heritage list, 12 years after China first applied for recognition of the ancient martial art

  • China can finally relax after winning a decade-long battle for the globally popular, centuries-old Chinese martial art to be granted heritage status by Unesco
  • Its inclusion on the cultural heritage list ‘will help this sport to reach more places’, a researcher says

Topic |   Martial arts
Tens of thousands of people perform tai chi to mark the first anniversary of the opening of the Beijing Olympics in 2009. The ancient Chinese martial art, widely practised around the world, has been granted intangible cultural heritage status by the United Nations’ cultural arm, Unesco. Photo: AP
Tens of thousands of people perform tai chi to mark the first anniversary of the opening of the Beijing Olympics in 2009. The ancient Chinese martial art, widely practised around the world, has been granted intangible cultural heritage status by the United Nations’ cultural arm, Unesco. Photo: AP
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