Rachel Smith depicted her panic attacks in miniature dioramas inside matchboxes. ““When the [2019] protests started my panic attacks stopped ... That’s another form of trauma,” the Hong Kong-based artist says. Photo: Xiaomei Chen Rachel Smith depicted her panic attacks in miniature dioramas inside matchboxes. ““When the [2019] protests started my panic attacks stopped ... That’s another form of trauma,” the Hong Kong-based artist says. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
Rachel Smith depicted her panic attacks in miniature dioramas inside matchboxes. ““When the [2019] protests started my panic attacks stopped ... That’s another form of trauma,” the Hong Kong-based artist says. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
Wellness

Victim of panic attacks turns negative into a positive by depicting the moments in miniature as matchbox art – a ‘symbolic way of storing her emotions’

  • After suffering panic attacks, Rachel Smith expressed her negative feelings in tiny dioramas she created in matchboxes. And she depicted her good days too
  • An art therapist says the creative process helps people cope with anxiety and can lead to inner peace

Topic |   Wellness
Rachel Smith depicted her panic attacks in miniature dioramas inside matchboxes. ““When the [2019] protests started my panic attacks stopped ... That’s another form of trauma,” the Hong Kong-based artist says. Photo: Xiaomei Chen Rachel Smith depicted her panic attacks in miniature dioramas inside matchboxes. ““When the [2019] protests started my panic attacks stopped ... That’s another form of trauma,” the Hong Kong-based artist says. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
Rachel Smith depicted her panic attacks in miniature dioramas inside matchboxes. ““When the [2019] protests started my panic attacks stopped ... That’s another form of trauma,” the Hong Kong-based artist says. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
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