Fans wait for the arrival of Jin, of the K-pop band BTS, outside a South Korean army boot camp in Yeoncheon, South Korea on December 13, the day he enlisted to do his military service. Jin sent a message on Weverse, the app for K-pop fans, that day. Photo: Reuters
Fans wait for the arrival of Jin, of the K-pop band BTS, outside a South Korean army boot camp in Yeoncheon, South Korea on December 13, the day he enlisted to do his military service. Jin sent a message on Weverse, the app for K-pop fans, that day. Photo: Reuters

It’s the app where fans of Blackpink, BTS and other musical acts buy merch, watch videos and interact with their idols: the rise of Weverse

  • ‘We didn’t have a database of our customers,’ says Joon Choi, president of Weverse, the app set up by K-pop group BTS’ management agency, Hybe, to remedy that
  • Now fans of more than 80 acts, including Blackpink and BTS, communicate, watch music videos and buy merch using the app, which has a global reach beyond K-pop

Fans wait for the arrival of Jin, of the K-pop band BTS, outside a South Korean army boot camp in Yeoncheon, South Korea on December 13, the day he enlisted to do his military service. Jin sent a message on Weverse, the app for K-pop fans, that day. Photo: Reuters
Fans wait for the arrival of Jin, of the K-pop band BTS, outside a South Korean army boot camp in Yeoncheon, South Korea on December 13, the day he enlisted to do his military service. Jin sent a message on Weverse, the app for K-pop fans, that day. Photo: Reuters
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